Moona Lisa

In 1997, I remixed the Leonardo da Vinci’s famous painting Mona Lisa into 142 perfectly spaced color beads placed at the intersections of an imaginary two-dimensional triangular network. Close up, the picture of the set of beads makes no sense, but if you see it from a distance you will perceive (or at least ‘guess’?) the portrait of Mona Lisa, the most famous Leonardo Da Vinci’s painting.

hidden mona lisa
Hidden Mona Lisa (1997), © Gianni A. Sarcone

Ghost Colors

This is one of my earliest color optical illusions. There is no yellow or green in the diamond shapes, just vertical black lines! (If you don’t believe it, use a eyedropper tool to check it.) This intriguing visual effect is mainly due to “color contrast induction“.

Illusive colors
Ghost Squares / Black Diamonds (2002 – 2007)
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Scintillating Starburst: Seeing rays that aren’t there…

This is one of my oldest illusions I created in the 90s. In the picture you may see ghostlike dark radial beams. This illusion is a variant of the Herman’s scintillating grid illusion. I designed this illusion just by turning 45 degrees the Herman grid and then by applying a polar transformation.

From my book “Eye Tricks“, 2001-2007.
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My dossier on visual illusions

Focus is an Italian monthly popular science magazine published in Milan, Italy, with which I have collaborated for more than 10 years.

Focus Magazine issue #336 featuring my article and my optical illusions has been released on October 2020. It contains my special 10-page dossier on visual perception with over 13 original visual illusions of my creation and their related explanation.

The cover also features a special effect I designed for Focus: as you read the main title, the cover image moves and, curiously enough, the title changes if you look at it closely (ILLUSIONI) or from a distance (COSA VEDI?).

Focus Mag cover

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Amazing Illusive Bookmark

Here is a neat optical illusion project I was commissioned by “Art of Play“. From one perspective, the grooves in the metal die-cut bookmark seem to be an abstract design but place the pattern against a solid background and a familiar figure pops into view!

Available from: https://www.artofplay.com/products/einstein-bookmark